The Top 5 Reasons We Love Retro Gaming

#5. Games Were Simpler Back In The Day

Video games have unquestionably become more ambitious and impressive in recent years. When you look at the likes of The Last Of Us, it’s impossible to overstate just how far video games have come since people were playing Pong forty-odd years ago. But for all the innovations within the medium, and for all the new fangled ideas and increasingly elaborate control schemes, there’s something to be said for how much more straight forward things were in the games we played as kids.

Gaming today can be difficult for people without the muscle memory that comes from years of dedicated gaming. Give your mum or dad a PS4 controller and if they’re anything like mine they’ll spend half the time playing the game looking down, attempting in vain to remember where all the buttons are. Use the left analog stick to walk, hold X to jog, or tap X to sprint. L2 is aim and R2 is shoot, but R1 becomes shoot if you’re driving because in a car R2 is the accelerator. R3 (that’s when you click in the right analog stick) let’s you look behind you, and to open the menu you need to hold down the touch pad. And that’s just part of the control scheme for Grand Theft Auto 5, one of the best selling games of all time.

Even for seasoned veterans the increasing complexity of games can become a turn off. Super Mario World is still as intuitive as it was back in 1990 because the inherently simple design and pick up and play nature of the game made it timeless. You can give a kid who’s never played a Mario game the controller and within seconds they’ll have worked out how to play. This simplicity is an attractive concept, which is almost certainly part of the reason that retro games like Shovel Knight and Axiom Verge are so popular today. The simpler a game is to play, the more inclusive and immediate the fun. Retro gaming has that in spades, and that’s the reason I’m still playing Super Mario World twenty-six years after release.

#4. Retro Games Have Better Music

As gaming production values have increased over the years, we’ve seen the medium change in many ways. We made the jump to 3D, we now have voice acting, and elaborate cut-scenes tell complicated stories that rival those seen in television or on the big screen. Games today feature fully orchestrated scores or soundtracks featuring popular music that are every bit as impressive as what we’d see in other mediums, but it feels like we’ve lost something along the way, too.

I can still hum the theme music to Treasure Island Dizzy on the Commodore 64. I was playing that game nearly thirty years ago and I haven’t played it since then (and I’ve still never beaten it, damn it) but I can still remember the theme music that plays in the background in its entirety. I played games last week and I couldn’t even tell you if they had music at all.

Because of the simplicity of early games, and without voice acting to tell a story, the music had to be good. Other than a few crummy sound effects, the music of the game was the only aural stimulation that the games provided. There are still great game soundtracks today, but they seem few and far between when compared to the games of my youth. Mega Man, Castlevania, the early Final Fantasy games, and iconic titles like Zelda, Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog – these all featured highly memorable tunes that stick with us long after the last time we played them. I still remember how the music for Commodore 64 classic Prince Clumsy changes when you save the princess at the end of the game like I was playing it yesterday. We can’t really say that about Shadow of Mordor, can we?

#3. Games Used to Work Right Out of the Box

One thing that games from yesteryear unquestionably did better than the games of today is that they, well, worked. You’d think that it should be a pretty fundamental aspect of any product released to the market, but it’s truly staggering how many games in 2016 ship broken, requiring either days or weeks of server tweaks to get the multiplayer working, or enormous day one patches to fix all of the bugs that made it onto the disc. Today, if you don’t have a decent Internet connection in your home, some games are genuinely unplayable, and many others severely hampered.

Street Fighter V released earlier this year, with Capcom promising that the single player Arcade Mode, a staple of the series, would be available to download in July. What if you don’t have an Internet connection? Well, then you’ve got half a game. That’s not a problem we faced when Street Fighter II released on the SNES in 1991. Back then, we had no Internet acting as a safety net for developers. Games had to work right out of the box.

Going back and playing Global Gladiators today is as simple as popping the cartridge into your Genesis and turning on the power. It works now as it did then; exactly as it should, and without any fuss. This is one of the many great things about retro gaming; if you’ve got the game and the hardware you’re pretty much good to go. You don’t need to download drivers, or updates, or patches. You put in the game, and then you play. Just like you should.

#2. Games Used to Be More of a Challenge

Today, anybody who keeps up to date with the latest trends in gaming will likely know of Dark Souls and Bloodborne, and the reputation these games have for punishing difficulty. Gamers flocked to the Souls series in droves, excited to play a title that challenged them and refused to hold their hands. There’s no extended tutorial sections. There’s little in the way of help. You can’t pause. And every enemy can make mincemeat out of you unless you learn their attack patterns and act accordingly. It’s exciting for a game to provide us with an uphill struggle like this, but then, I’m old enough to remember a time when every game was like this. And worse.

Modern games have a tendency to spell things out to the player, often to an almost insulting degree. Popping a disc into a PS4 in 2016 means waiting for the install, then the day one patch, and then when you finally get a controller in your hand you spend the next two hours being walked through the early stages of the game like a kid on his first day of school. Everybody likes a bit of help now and again, but there’s something to be said for just being thrown in at the deep end and being told to sink or swim.

#1. Nostalgia

Nostalgia might seem like a cop out answer; after all, looking back on the past with rose tinted spectacles is often what fans of anything retro are criticized with. It’s easy to dismiss nostalgia as a way of justifying the opinion that everything was just much better in your day, but the truth is that nostalgia is an immensely powerful agent and it shouldn’t be ignored.

Today, we watch rubbish movies and bemoan the use of obvious CGI, but we’ll happily sit through Raiders of the Lost Ark and not bother mentioning that the melting Nazi at the end looks like he’s made out of plasticine. We listen to the appalling pop music of our youths with a reflective smile on our faces while turning our noses up at Justin Bieber’s latest video. And we’ll talk about Final Fantasy VII as though it were second coming of Christ, completely ignoring all of the flaws in the game that we’d hang a modern game out to dry for. Nostalgia is a strong enough influence to make us believe that Sonic the Hedgehog was actually ever good. Now, that’s serious.

The reason a lot of us like playing old games is simply because of the feeling we get playing them. I’ve played hundreds, if not thousands of games in my time as a gamer. And I’m smart enough to know that in that time video games have improved in almost every way. But that doesn’t change the fact that if I load up Street Fighter II I remember the days of playing it during the school summer holidays with all my friends. I remember the day I completed Toejam and Earl with my brother every time I hear the first few bars of its ridiculously funky theme music. And I remember the giddy thrills we got when we first got the fatalities working on Mortal Kombat II.

Playing old games, just as with watching old movies or listening to old albums, transports us to a time in the past that we like to remember. Whether it’s memories of old friends, loved ones, people we may see every day or might have lost touch with, every old game we load up is a window to the past and that’s special. The latest Call of Duty is never going to compete with that.

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The Top 5 Forgotten N64 Games

The N64 was not the finest hour for Nintendo. The decision to stick with cartridges not only made games for the system more expensive, but also forced some publishers to take their games to PlayStation knowing that the CD format was cheaper to use and allowed them more storage. One of the most famous games to abandon Nintendo due to the hardware limitations of cartridges was, of course, Final Fantasy VII. The seventh instalment in the JRPG franchise went on to be a massive hit and was almost single-handedly responsible for selling the first PlayStation to Japanese gamers. The rest, as they say, is history.

But the N64 is remembered for more than dodgy hardware decisions and a somewhat ridiculous controller. The system is remembered for some stellar games, too. GoldenEye was hugely important for consoles as one of the first console FPS games fully embraced by the mainstream. Ocarina of Time took the familiar Zelda formula and applied it expertly to three dimensions, with the game often featuring alongside the aforementioned Final Fantasy VII when having conversations about the greatest games of all time. And of course there was Mario 64, which effectively showed the world just how good 3D platform games could be.

As any comedian will tell you, they can’t all be zingers, though. For one reason or another, not every game makes the splash that it really ought to. Some are destined to be underrated. Some cult classics. And others to be nothing more than a name that you struggle to get off the tip of your tongue when talking with your friends.

With that in mind, here’s the top 5 forgotten N64 games.

WinBack

Gamers that owned the original PlayStation will likely wax lyrical about a little game called Metal Gear Solid. It was one of the first console stealth-action games to really make an impact on the mainstream market, and after the success of the first Solid game the series became an important flagship for the PlayStation console. What few gamers remember though, is that the N64 had a stealth-action game of its own though in WinBack. Featuring ahead-of-its-time cover based shooting and some not-quite-MGS stealth mechanics, WinBack was a great game that was sadly in the wrong place at the wrong time. Metal Gear Solid went on to be one of the biggest series’ in gaming, and WinBack went on to be number 5 in our forgotten N64 games list.

Tetrisphere

Tetris is a hugely important game. One of the best selling titles of all time, and one that was a massive money-spinner for Nintendo on Game Boy, the ultra-popular puzzle game so successfully transcended the gaming medium that it’s up there with Pac-Man and Pong in the list of games that even your Grandpa has heard of. One thing Gramps almost certainly won’t have heard of though, is Tetrisphere. Just like you might have figured out from the name, Tetrisphere was essentially Tetris played, well, on a sphere. Eschewing all notions of the idea that “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it”, Tetrisphere was one of the few games that managed to put a new spin on an old classic and not leave everyone involved red faced.

Blast Corps

Blast Corps was a game of little finesse. There’s no elaborate story to follow. There’s no emotional connection to characters. There are no delusions of grandeur. This is a game in which you drive trucks through cities and suburbs and smash them up real good. And that’s about it. The trucks never handled particularly well, and the forced repetition of levels could certainly grate, but there was something incredibly satisfying about reducing a city to rubble using just one little truck.

Beetle Adventure Racing

On the surface, Beetle Adventure Racing might sound like little more than a cash-in or an advertisement dressed up as a game, but to the surprise of anyone who played it, the game was a rare treat. Access to some parts of the game was cut off in the beginning with the player charged with unlocking them via exploration and standard racing throughout a massively enjoyable single player experience. The focus on exploration as well as more traditional racing didn’t quite make it an open world racer like we see today, but it was certainly ahead of its time. And the local multiplayer? It was up there with GoldenEye for the most fun you could have on the system.

Ogre Battle 64: Person of Lordly Caliber

Okay, let’s get it out of the way. Ogre Battle 64: Person of Lordly Caliber has an absolutely ridiculous name. And that might well have contributed to the cartridge not landing on many Christmas lists all those years ago, bagging Ogre Battle the dubious honour of being number one on our list of forgotten N64 games. The overlooked role playing game featured a huge branching story, some decision making, and a surprising amount of replay value thanks to the way the world would change based on your actions. While you’ll likely get nothing but bewildered looks if you try talking about the game with many gamers today, Ogre Battle was a wonderful RPG and one that any self-respecting fan of retro gaming should endeavour to try out.

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Singleplayer Games

What are “Single player Games”? Singleplayer games are games that are meant for just one person. Only one person can play that game… all alone… all by themselves. For people that may be socially shy or awkward, don’t speak the majority language for that game or are too young to interact with others, this can be a great thing.

With singleplayer games, there is no need to worry about predators, stalkers, youth seeing nudity, hearing language, being bullied, harassment, verbal abuse, losing content, or having to interact with others. You can just enjoy playing your game without a care in the world. So you really don’t have to worry about much of anything since these games are just for one person.

Just because you may be the only one playing the game, that doesn’t mean there aren’t things to be cautious of. While most negative things about all types of gaming come from some of the actual real-life people on those games, some of the negative things are from the type of games and the types of games for the wrong person.

There are plenty of horror games, games with nudity, language, intense topics, intense scenes, smoking, drugs and alcohol, gambling with real life money, suggestive themes, blood and gore, games that have violence, etc., that are just for one person.

You really need to look at the game’s website, social accounts, videos, pictures, description, tags and especially the reviews. You need to gather all the information on the game you’re thinking about buying, whether for yourself or someone else.

If the game is on Steam, Humble Bundle, or some similar websites; they will show you the description, videos by that company, pictures, user and non-user tags, user reviews, website, company, and social accounts. However, if you’re on the game’s website, they might not show everything you need to know to decide whether to buy the game or not.

The least some game companies will show is a very short sales pitch description, a small amount of pictures (5 at best), a video or two by them, and their social accounts. The most they will show is an informative description, pictures by them and users, user reviews, videos by them and their social accounts. I’m not going to get into the good and bad in gaming and how to tell if the game is good or not in this article, that’s another article.

Now you’d think all games would have a singleplayer mode and then add other modes later. After all, it’s somewhat easier to have players play by themselves and create a new world or file than it is to pay so many dollars a month or year to host a server, have the troubles of getting and keeping the server up, and then having players actually connect to the server. At the beginning, you would think some games will add a Singleplayer mode before they add Co-Op or Multiplayer mode right? WRONG!

There are lots and lots of games that only have Multiplayer mode, Co-Op mode, and any other mode that is not Singleplayer. Some games are just meant for Multiplayer, like MMOs (Massively Multiplayer Online). It is possible to play multiplayer games with more than one person on one computer in the same room, but most people call that Local Multiplayer or Local Co-Op. This allows you to play with someone on the same computer in the same room.

You couldn’t play with someone from Sweden if you’re in the USA on Local Multiplayer or Local Co-Op. You have to go online for that. It’s the same as how you talk to people all over the world from Twitter, Facebook, Discord, Skype, etc., which are all online. If your internet is down, you cannot talk to anyone on those platforms because it’s not online.

There are many different types of games and game modes for different people. You can get a game that is strictly singleplayer or a game that has both singleplayer and multiplayer and just play singleplayer for the time being. Some people like the game and not the multiplayer part so they only play the singleplayer part. I recommend starting with singleplayer and then getting a game later that has both so you can ease into multiplayer versus getting thrown into multiplayer.

Singleplayer games can be a great starting point for those new to the world of gaming. Erica Wagner is a Teenpreneur, Best Selling Author, Gamer, YouTuber and Instructor. She has been online since becoming a teenager. Connect with Erica through her YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/VirtualVelScience

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Board Games – Have Deep Historical Roots Buried In The Sands Of Time

Monopoly, Risk and Clue have roots buried deep in the sands of ancient Mesopotamia.

British archeologist Charles Leonard Woolley unearthed the earliest known board game in the late 1920’s. He was excavating a burial tomb in Ur, what is now southern Iraq. The game, buried with other treasure, had been interred nearly 4,500 years earlier. The Royal Game of Ur is the earliest known board game. Not only did Woolley find the game board and game pieces, he also found instructions for playing the game. They were engraved in cuneiform texts located at the site. The Royal Game of Ur, or the ‘game of 20 squares’ was a race game with two players racing to the end of the board. Since that time similar game boards have been found throughout the ancient world, from Egypt to India. The game Woolley found can still be played today, just as the ancient Sumerians enjoyed it.

Board games have been popular in nearly every known civilization. Many civilizations were playing board games before they developed any form of written language.

Board games come in two basic types. The first uses strategy to win the game. The object is to block or capture opposing game pieces or to capture larger portions of the game board. Monopoly and checkers are both examples of the strategy game. Strategy alone does not insure victory.

Chance plays a significant role in most board games, but not all. Some of the most respectable board games, chess for example, focus on skill with very little luck involved.

Purists feel that luck is an undesirable element. They feel the games should be based entirely on strategy and skill. Others feel the element of chance gives these games more complexity with many more possible strategies. These people feel the element of luck makes these games more exciting. On the other hand, games that are completely games of chance, where no or few decisions are made, quickly become boring to most adults. Many children’s board games are games of luck with few decisions to be made.

The second types of board games are race games. Two or more players move pieces in a race from one point on the board to another. Backgammon is an example of a race game. Again, the element of chance is an essential ingredient in these games.

Luck is introduced into the game in a number of ways. One of the popular ways is by using dice. The dice can determine how many units a play can move, how forces fare in battle or which resources a player gains. Another common method of introducing change is by using a deck of special cards. In yet other games spinners or other such devices are used to determine the play.

A third type of board games is a combination both of the above types. These games employ strategies to conduct a race.

Board Games Pre-date Reading And Writing

Board games have been popular for centuries. The game of 20 squares was played from Egypt to India more than 4,000 years ago. Nearly 3,000 years ago a game that resembles backgammon was developed in the same region. Games using stone marbles were developed in Egypt nearly 1,000 years later.

A board game is a game played with a pre-marked surface and counters or pieces that are moved across the board. Methods of chance are often used, usually dice or cards, to determine the movement of the pieces or counters across the surface of the board.

We are not really sure why early board games were developed. Some argue these games were a device for conducting religious services. Others claim they were employed to teach strategies of war. Today’s board games are recreational and considered good family entertainment.

Board games became popular in the U.S. in the early 1900s. As the population moved off the farm, people had more time and more money to pursue leisure activities. Board games were a family recreation easily played in the home. Chess, checkers and backgammon became tremendously popular.

The most popular board game of all time is Monopoly. In 1904 Elizabeth Maggie patented “The Landlord’s Game” an early version of Monopoly. It was based upon economic principles and was designed to teach real estate ownership and management.

In 1933, Clarence Darrow copyrighted a version of “The Landlord’s Game.” He called it “Monopoly.” He went to the game company, Parker Brothers, for help producing the game. They turned him down because they said it would never sell. He began selling Monopoly for the 1934 Christmas season. He was overwhelmed with orders. Parker Brothers agreed to produce the game the following year. Monopoly is now printed in 15 languages and sold worldwide.

Favorite old board games have recently been redeveloped for a whole new generation. These classics have been developed as electronic games. Most popular board games have now been successfully adapted as electronic games. These games are played on game consoles and on personal computers.

Board games have come along way since the days of ancient Sumerians when they were played around campfires of camel trains. Astronauts millions of miles above the earth have played board games. Now, with the Internet, players half a world apart can come together in cyberspace and enjoy the challenge of board games.

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Popular Electronic Games – They Are Not Just For Kids Anymore

Superheroes battle monsters and space invaders in fast action games. Players take on the role of these superheroes in epic battles. In other games players race cars, boats, motorcycles, helicopters and planes against villains and even less evil opponents to win high stakes races.

Game titles such as Burnout3: Takedown, ESPN, NHL – 2K5, Silent Hill 4: The Room, Terminator 3: The Redemption, Donkey Kong 3, and, Pokemon have joined the national lexicon as kids have flocked to the lure of electronic games.

Parents, teachers, preachers and politicians, have criticized and in some cases even banned electronic games. Electronic games have been blamed for poor grades, poor conduct and even poor health. If you listen long enough, electronic games are responsible for all of the problems our young people experience today.

One thing is certain. Kids love them. They buy and play them in ever increasing numbers. Electronic games are here to stay.

People have been trying to play games on computers almost since the days of the very first computer. As early as 1950, Claude Shannon, a mathematician and engineer, believed that computers could be programmed to play chess in competition with humans. He became intrigued with the concept of artificial intelligence. In pursuit of this idea researchers and scientists designed crude games that could be played on the huge and clumsy computers of the 1950s and 1960s.

The first actual electronic games as a consumer product were built as coin operated arcade games in the early 1970s. In 1971 Nolan Bushnell, Ted Dabney and Al Alcorn formed the first game company, Atari. Soon after they produced the first game console and their first electronic game, Pong, as an arcade game. Pong was immediately successful.

This success led Atari and other firms to begin work on home game consoles that could be hooked to TV sets. Atari released its first home console in 1977. Soon games were put on cartridges that could be changed at the whim of the player.

By 1979, the company, Activision, was formed by former Atari game designers. The purpose of this new company was to focus strictly on game software. They decided to leave the development of equipment to play electronic games to other people. This was the first company to build a business of developing and selling electronic games software.

In a short time a spate of game companies sprang up trying to develop software for the infant electronic game industry. The result was a glut of poorly conceived games hitting the market. Consumers turned away in droves and the home electronic game industry faded hit the skids.

By the early 1980s, electronic games were being developed for personal computers. Color graphics, flexible storage capacity and general purpose processors made games much easier to play on personal computers. The game console business was all but dead.

In the late 1980s, two Japanese companies introduced a new generation of game consoles that were technologically capable of handling the new electronic games being produced. These companies were Nintendo and Sega. These game consoles had graphics capabilities that exceeded those of most personal computers. Nintendo also offered a feature that let the console record the game action so a player could pause the action of a game.

Right behind Nintendo came Game Boy, a hand-held game console. Game consoles enjoyed a resurgence of popularity during the 1990s. A new, even more sophisticated generation of electronic games was introduced by 2001. These consoles included Playstation2 and Xbox. Electronic games continued to become more complex with more action and more graphics.

Electronic games, today, have achieved art form status. They are sort of a wonderful combination of board games and comic books all rolled up into one medium with spectacular graphics and compelling audio. Curiously enough, most electronic games are similar to board games. They have one of two central themes. The first is racing and the other is capturing area or opponents. Perhaps it is because of these similarities that electronic games have begun to capture a wider audience.

As electronic games have matured they have begun to attract more mature audiences. Initially these games were primarily toys for boys. The growth area in the game industry is no longer adolescent males. It is mature adults, both men and women. Many of the most popular board games have been adapted to electronic game formats. Where youngsters hooked game consoles to TV sets, adults are playing games on their PCs, often against other players across the Internet. Grandparents are playing electronic games with grandchildren. They are also joining game clubs to play electronic games on the Internet with other senior citizens in another state or half a world away. Many of the top game companies are betting that older adults are the new growth market for the game industry.

Claude Shannon believed that computers could be programmed to play chess. In a sense he was right. He certainly never imagined chess players reaching across cyberspace as they exercise chess strategies on computerized game boards. Nor could he have imagined video poker, Internet casinos and all of the other popular electronic games people of all ages are playing. Electronic games aren’t just for kids anymore.

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Massage in Bucharest

Recognize it! You’re busy! And so must be! That’s what life is like! But you want more than that, you want to do more for yourself and massage can help. Because massage makes more than a simple relaxation of the mind and body. It keeps your body in shape and gives you enough energy to make you enjoy a longer life better than you do it today.

Massage releases stress. At the moment, stress is a universal evil. Every time you are late, every time you avoid a car in traffic, every time you have trouble working, stress is doing his job. Each time adrenaline increases heart rate and cortisone levels and organs respond to the measure. You will be in a state of nerves and constant agitation.
When there is no release of stress, serious problems such as an upset stomach, hypertension, sleep disturbances, chest pain, or existing illness may worsen.

Some of the changes that may occur are: Anxiety, lack of concentration, depression, permanent fatigue, muscle or bone pain, sexual dysfunction, excessive sleep or insomnia

All these stress-related problems can be diminished and some can be totally eliminated by massage. The researchers concluded that a massage session can lower heart rate and blood pressure, relax your muscles and increase endorphin production. The massage also releases serotonin and dopamine and the result is a general relaxation, both physical and mental.
Our body care must be at the top of the priorities.
By adding the massage to your routine you will look much better and you will be much healthier and relaxed. Massage can improve your vitality and mood. Massage can prepare for a long and beautiful life.

Our masseuses personalize each massage session according to the needs of the individual.
Our massage parlors offer a variety of relaxation styles and techniques to help you. Apart from relaxing, massage can be a powerful ally in reducing pain, increasing energy levels, improving mental and physical performance

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After a massage session, you will see how the mental prospects are enriched, the body allows easier handling, better pressure resistance, relaxation and mental alertness, calm and creative thinking.
When you have the impression or force yourself to stay straight, your body is not actually aligned properly. Not only does the posture look bad, but it forces some of the muscles to go muddy all day, while others become weaker. After a long time, the incorrect position may cause other drops. For example, internal organs press on what affects digestion, breathing ability is also diminished, which means that much less blood and oxygen reaches the brain and hence all sorts of other complications.

Massage allows you to return your body to the track. Allowing the body to make healthy and accurate movements is one of the greatest benefits of massage. Massage can relax and restore muscles injured by bad posture, allowing the body to position itself in a natural, painless position.
Apart from posture, there is also anxiety. One of the signs of anxiety and stress can also be heavy breathing. When the body begins to breathe too little and deeply instead of breathing at a natural rithm, it is impossible for one to relax. One reason may also be that the chest muscles and the abdomen get tightened and the air gets harder.

Massage plays an important role in learning the body how to relax and how to improve breathing. Respiratory problems such as allergies, sinuses, asthma or bronchitis are a group of conditions that can benefit from massage. In fact, massage can have a positive impact on respiratory function.

Many of the muscles in the front and back of the upper part of the body are breathing accessory. When these muscles are tight and shorten they can block normal breathing and interrupt effective breathing natural rithm. Massage techniques for stretching and relaxing these muscles improves breathing function and breathability. Massage leads to an opening of the chest as well as structural alignment and nerve dilatation that are required for optimal pulmonary function. A good way to treat respiratory problems with massage is the taping made in Swedish massage. When done on the back, along with vibrations, it can detach the mucus from the lungs and can clean the airways for better later function.

Massage not only relaxes muscles, but helps people become aware of daily stress levels. Once the body recognizes what really means relaxation, the mind can rest easily relax before the stress becomes cornice and harmful. This will help you enjoy a balanced life. Massage controls breathing, allows the mind to re-create relaxation before the occurrence of chronic and harmful stress and increases the level of energy.